Spain

The Prettiest Town in Southern Spain, Frigiliana

The Spanish have a word for viewpoint, mirador. While beautiful views can be found all over Southern Spain, the miradors in Frigiliana are exceptional enough to make you believe the word was founded there.

Winding cobbled streets with whitewashed homes set against blue skies, rolling hillsides dotted with trees and trails, and the ocean in the far distance.

It’s incredible.

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I visited Frigiliana as part of a road trip around Andalusia. It was a stopover for me on my way to Nerja. Coming from Malaga, it took about 50 minutes on the non-toll roads to reach the historic centre of town.

I drove up to the centre, and then parked in the garage located between each side of Frigiliana. Such a bargain- less than €3 for the several hours I was parked there.

Frigiliana is the kind of place best explored by foot. However, make sure you wear shoes suitable for walking steep slopes and navigating cobblestone streets.

After Frigiliana, I drove to Nerja for the evening, which only took 15 minutes. If you decide to visit, but don’t want to stay in Frigiliana, it’s easy enough to visit in a day (or even a half day) from Malaga or Nerja.

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What makes Frigiliana so special? Sure, there are plenty of white washed towns in Andalusia, but Frigiliana is stunning.

It’s location means the views from the top of town are spectacular. But, the winding alleyways also contribute to the setting. Decked out in lush plants, hanging bougainvillaea and jasmin, towering cacti, beautiful murals and brightly painted doors, it’s a wandering dream.

With each street, you get the sense there’s explore around the next corner.

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One thing to note, Frigiliana is technically a village divided into two halves- the newer, lower section and the older, Morisco-Mudéjar neighbourhood. I spent about a half hour roaming the newer section, but the older section is where I ended up spending most of my time. 

Meandering the upper streets, I felt transported in time to a land of Moorish Kingdoms.

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Despite being recognised as one of the prettiest towns in Andalusia, when I visited early on a Sunday afternoon, it didn’t feel overly busy. Granted I was there in mid-March, I still felt like like I had some parts of town to myself. Sure, there were other tourists around and I think I even saw one coach bus, but it was no where near as crowded as Granada or even Cordoba and Ronda.

If you’re visiting during the day, have lunch or tapas at one of the several restaurants with a view- my favourites one was Restaurante El Mirador De Frigiliana. Next to the restaurant, there’s another overlook with a few benches to soak it all in from. Another noteworthy stop was Cafetería Almijara, we enjoyed sipping cafe con leche on the outdoor terrace, watching as people climbed their way to the top of town.

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My time in Frigiliana felt so blissful. Whether you stay for a few hours or a few days, it’s a must visit on a trip through Andalusia.

Have you ever been to Andalusia? Which towns were your favourite stops? 

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